the brilliantly leaping gazelle

Why the Brexit party is the political equivalent of caveat emptor!

Caveat emptor is struck me earlier today as I thought about the Brexit party, because it literally means ‘Let the buyer beware’

Because, as the Daily Telegraph noted, when attempting ti inform its readers of what the Brexit parties policies were,

They don’t have any. The Brexit Party isn’t a party in the traditional sense, and Mr Farage has chosen to emulate the Vote Leave campaign by deliberately steering clear of details.

Adding,

Instead, the campaign focuses on attacking Westminster politicians and on the “betrayal” of the Brexit vote. While Mr Farage hasn’t offered up any solutions to the Brexit conundrum, he has made clear that he is in favour of the hardest Brexit possible.

Before helpfully clearing things up by adding,

He has also promised a “full slate” of policies once the European elections are out of the way. He told a rally in West Yorkshire that they would include “political reform, more help for the regions, scrapping of ludicrous projects like HS2”.

One charitable interpretation of this is that as their single aim is for the want the U.K will hopefully leave the E.U. soon, they don’t have to. However, if they do so well that it triggers a ‘no confidence’ vote in the government, and that in turn triggers a general election, and that in turn uses up time better spent on sorting things, then is it a good use of the vote?

Essentially a vote for the Brexit Party may on the face of it appear to returning democracy to the people, but my concern is that it is anything but. Do I trust him? Not in the slightest! How can possibly trust some who fanny’s about with something as basic as the pronunciation of their surname.  As I noted in 2014,

How do you pronounce garage? Go on – try it out loud, I’m in no hurry. Done it? If you’re anything like me, then your pronunciation of garage will have sounded like how the word porridge sounds. But on the other hand, if you’re Nigel Farage then your surname sounds as if a pirate has hijacked it with the result that Farage becomes Faraaarhhge. Somehow he’s managed to convince every media outlet, every political commentator that his name is not pronounced the way it is spelt.Before I start, here’s your starter for ten? How do you pronounce garage? Go on – try it out loud, I’m in no hurry. Done it? If you’re anything like me, then your pronunciation of garage will have sounded like how the word porridge sounds. But on the other hand, if you’re Nigel Farage then your surname sounds as if a pirate has hijacked it with the result that Farage becomes Faraaarhhge. Somehow he’s managed to convince every media outlet, every political commentator that his name is not pronounced the way it is spelt.

And if if can do that, what else might he be capable of? That’s the thing. No one knows.

Oh, by the way, just because I don’t like him, or what he might do or his potential effect on the body politic, or his lowest common denominator rhetoric, or his view that the N.H.S. should be privatised it doesn’t mean that somehow my antipathy toward him extends to those who reluctantly voted for the Brexit party out of a deeply held personal conviction that the result of the referendum was being betrayed, then I don’t hate you.

I hate you more than that! (And you know who you are!)

 

Vote for Nigel Farrage and the Brexit Party?Behave! I mean, I’m brain damaged, not mad!

When I was in a medically induced coma for a month after my accident, they had to put a tube down my throat to help me breath,  but whilst essential to keeping me alive then, now it has had a a rather unfortunate consequence on my speech. Also when I woke up, it was discovered that the part of my brain responsible for movement and co-ordination had been damaged. That’s enough to be going with.

Thankfully, my powers of critical thinking, logical deduction, and consequential reasoning were pretty much the same as they were. Thats why there was no realistic prospect whatsoever for me voting for the Nigel Farrages Brexit Party, not just because he looks like Kermit the Frog, not just because he has a surname that sounds like some cheap copy of chocolates that Excellency’s spoil us with, and not because because, as I wrote in the less divisive climate of 2014;

Nigel likes to prove his man of the people credentials as often as possible, either being interviewed or photographed in a pub and is often seen drinking a pint. Is it only me that remembers that photo’s of that well regarded humanitarian Tony Blair , albeit onebeing photographed with a mug of tea, strumming a guitar, or famously, when walking with the peace loving George Bush, having both hands tucked rather too self consciously into his jeans. Only me, I suppose who thinks that any politician who wants to appear like a ‘pretty regular kind of guy’’ – as Blair claimed to be – is usually anything but.

Because, who knows, it might just be me being cynical, maybe he really is a regular man of the people, albeit one who went to Dulwich college (a public school) and upon leaving  embarked on a career as a trader in brokerage firms on the London Metal Exchange. This is the sole extent of his working history until he became an MEP (a Member of the European Parliament).. A politician who went to public school and then worked in the city before becoming a politician. Sound familiar? Or am I just being cynical?

Not only is it because, as I wrote in 2014

Only a cynic would point out that that is why his personal details are a suitably vague. Equally, if ones main hobby-horse is to bang on about a little Europe has done for this country, and how Britain would be better off divorcing ourselves from a political union with Europe, the last thing you want known is that not only do you command a large salary from being an MEP  – over £78,000 per year. (That’s not including paying your wife up to – no-ones quite sure – £20,00 a year for being your secretary) Or that your voting record is only 45.57%

No, what you wouldn’t want known by a public outraged by M.P’s expenses, was that you’d claimed over £2million in expenses since riding the gravy train first class.

Nor is it because, as Jonathan Freedland in yesterdays Guardian, asked,

Why is Nigel Farage immune to scandals that would destroy his rivals?

just before going onto list them for us. I hadn’t paid much attention to the Aaron Banks paying for his chauffeur and car before, until I realised that if it was a smear, it was one that had benefited our man of the people £450,000!

No, it is because his brand of plain, honest speaking, that you can’t trust other politicians and because I’m not one of them, you can trust me, I understand your concerns, I get it is symptomatic of a right wing populist movement that’s gaining ground all over Europe. Under the guise of articulating whatever invented threat, exaggerated fear or existential threat that poses a threat to democratic norms that succeeds in garnering popular support, they’ll fan those flames whilst complaining about the damage the fire is causing.

And recent history has shown us where this kind of populist, rabble rousing can lead. No, not to Hitlers Germany. But we should’ve learnt from that before the horrors General Ratko Miadic, Bosnia, and ‘ethnic cleansing.’visited Europe. If we don’t learn from the past, we’ll repeat it and it’s only when we’ve reached the point of no return that people realise they’re on a slippery slope

Like I said I;m brain damaged, not mad.